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Minor Deity
Picture of Axtremus
posted
https://www.washingtonpost.com...dbf9d4fed_story.html

We use GPS. We dumb with maps and navigation.


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www.PianoRecital.org -- my piano recordings

 
Posts: 10766 | Registered: 01 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
(self-titled) semi-posting lurker
Minor Deity
Picture of ShiroKuro
posted Hide Post
Interesting article! I would guess that, just like with reading or studying on e-devices, there's some variation depending on how one uses the device.

Also, it would be interesting to do a generational comparison to compare 1) how (older) people with past experience navigating with paper maps then use hand-held GPS devices, versus 2) how (younger) people with no past experience navigating with paper maps use hand-held GPS devices.

I was the family navigator from a fairly young age, I loved reading maps and from JH/HS on I always did the planning and directing on family cross-country trips while my mother drove. I actually was majoring in digital cartography with the intention of becoming a map maker before I discovered my love of Japanese language.

Anyway, re navigating from maps, I continued to do that for a long time, and when I moved to Japan, I had to drive myself all over the countryside based on paper maps. I did that for more than 10 years, and it was only after a year or two back in the states that I started using the iPhone map app. So anecdotally because I don't want to admit that my ability to navigate may have been diminished by using my iPhone, I would guess that the way I navigate from an iPhone is different from someone 30 years younger than me, just because I had all this map-based experience.

Also, "ethnonostalgia" -- What a great word!!
ETA oops it's "ethnostalgia" ... still great.


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My piano recordings at Box.Net: https://app.box.com/s/j4rgyhn72uvluemg1m6u

 
Posts: 11598 | Location: not in Japan any more | Registered: 20 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of CHAS
posted Hide Post
I studied maps and charts.
I navigated around the San Juan islands and used the fast tides there to best advantage.
Now I use the GPS in my phone and yell at it when I disagree.


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Slogan for ANYONE running against 45 in 2 years (Republicans included): “Hindsight 2020”



 
Posts: 20310 | Location: Still living at 9000 feet in the High Rockies of Colorado | Registered: 20 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Foregoing Practicing to Post
Minor Deity
Picture of RealPlayer
posted Hide Post
Because of my age and lack of smartphone or GPS device, I still use maps. And I enjoy looking at them, just from an aesthetic standpoint. GPS will not tell you about the interesting features you are missing going from A to B; a physical map might.

I do print out a direction sheet from Google Maps or Mapquest, etc. sometimes before a trip. It still can be confusing if signage is different or you misperceive distances...much nicer to have a voice tell you "turn in 200 feet."

We got a TripTik from AAA recently (remember those?) I bet they're phasing them out. They ignored our initial order, so we had to order it twice.


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Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the human race. -- H.G. Wells

 
Posts: 11676 | Registered: 27 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Serial origamist
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of pianojuggler
posted Hide Post
TripTiks were pretty cool. I used them driving across the country a couple of times. But you really needed the separate map along with the TripTik in case you decided to take a little detour.

I love maps, too. My love for them blossomed further when I was learning to fly. Aviation maps cover the same area as a road map, but look completely different. When you're driving, you don't really need to know what is the tallest structure around.

A flight instructor friend of mine said one of his students was getting ready to go on his first long solo flight and the instructor noticed the student had a road atlas and a pair of binoculars in his bag. He asked what was up with that and the student said, "I figure if I get lost, I can use the binoculars to look for road signs, then find where I am on the map." The instructor's reply was "we need to talk".

I love google maps but for a couple of things: it shows you place names very selectively. A paper map has all the place names all the time. And on the screen, the text of those place names is the same size no matter how far you zoom in. I guess I could increase the font size on the browser... if that affects google maps.


A couple months ago, we were driving from Orleans to Paris and I had to get the car back to the rental place by 4:30. Google maps told us to take an exit off the main highway and we drove for about 40km until it told us to get off the highway completely. After another couple km, I told my navigator to give me the phone. We were in some place called Pithiviers, and the only reasonable route from there was dozens of km on a two-lane road with roundabouts every two or three km. It was lovely, driving through the farmland and a few small medieval towns, but I needed to get the car back on time. Then, approaching Paris, google said that there was a long backup, but it knew a faster way. I agreed, but when the exit for the shortcut came up, it was clear the road was closed (no wonder there was no traffic on it!).

My navigator said she might have accidentally touched something that re-routed us.

In the end, we got the car to the garage at 4:45 with a stop to get gas. Fortunately, there was a woman ahead of us who was having a meltdown because the attendant was going to charge her several thousand euros for returning the car dirty--or so I gleaned from my very limited French. Around 5:00 she wandered off and the attendant checked my odometer and gas gauge and sent us on our way so he could take care of the other four or five cars that had piled up behind us.

Oh, and in Orleans, we drove in circles for most of an hour before figuring out that our hotel was on a street that was closed to car traffic while google maps kept saying "your destination is on the right", but then sending us in ever-larger circles up and down the same street that was perpendicular to the one we were looking for.


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pj, citizen-poster, unless specifically noted otherwise.

mod-in-training.

pj@ermosworld∙com

When a door closes, a can of worms opens.

 
Posts: 26492 | Registered: 27 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of CHAS
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I love maps. Don't buy them often anymore.
I do buy nautical charts of places I want to visit.
Hey, I was engaged to the daughter of Hammond of Hammond maps for a while. Smiler


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Slogan for ANYONE running against 45 in 2 years (Republicans included): “Hindsight 2020”



 
Posts: 20310 | Location: Still living at 9000 feet in the High Rockies of Colorado | Registered: 20 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Lord Emperor Mom
Minor Deity
Picture of Mary Anna
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I have a terrible sense of direction and I have poor spatial skills. I traveled all over the country alone before we had GPS. I'm guessing I got lost more than most people did, but I managed. (There were a few times when I got lost and wound up in neighborhoods where I might have been a teeny bit unsafe. Okay, I lived in Camden and even with a GPS I found myself in some places where I shouldn't have been, but I survived.)

That's all just background to my point, which is that most people manage to find their way with the tools at their disposal. Some people just have an easier time than others. If aliens zap our navigational satellites and we have to go back to maps, I imagine we'll be okay.

The transition would favor those among us who are geographically talented, but it would also favor those who are level-headed and adaptable, which is my strategy for prevailing over a hard task. I was once on a long trip with another author and we were hopelessly lost in Louisville, Kentucky, even with our GPS. I was driving and every time we'd find that we'd gone wrong again, I just found a way to turn around and try a new approach. She commented that I seemed pretty unflappable, and I said that we'd eventually solve this problem if we kept trying.

In general, I've found that there's a lot of value in being willing to try something you're not good at, fail at it, and then keep trying until you figure it out.


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Mary Anna Evans
http://www.maryannaevans.com
MaryAnna@ermosworld.com

 
Posts: 13954 | Location: Florida | Registered: 22 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pinta & the Santa Maria
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of Nina
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We still keep a big ol' highway atlas in our road car. It's fun to look at on longer trips, and indispensable if for some reason the route that GPS is giving you is unsuitable.
 
Posts: 31657 | Location: West: North and South! | Registered: 20 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Minor Deity
Picture of Axtremus
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Ha, yes, I keep big ‘ol highway atlas in the car, too. Smiler


--------------------------------
www.PianoRecital.org -- my piano recordings

 
Posts: 10766 | Registered: 01 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of Daniel
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Hmm.

People are supposed to use GPS navigation the same way pilots use it when flying (watch one of those videos of pilots landing a plane).

I'm not convinced that's necessary or even desirable.
 
Posts: 20703 | Registered: 31 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of well-tempered gardener
posted Hide Post
Don't have GPS; have never used it. But then I don't travel much to places with which I'm not familiar.

When I do, I look at a map ahead of time....

Now please get off my lawn.

Big Grin


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Bazootiehead-in-training


 
Posts: 22718 | Location: Somewhere in the middle | Registered: 19 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of Daniel
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Mary Anna:
I have a terrible sense of direction and I have poor spatial skills. I traveled all over the country alone before we had GPS. I'm guessing I got lost more than most people did, but I managed. (There were a few times when I got lost and wound up in neighborhoods where I might have been a teeny bit unsafe. Okay, I lived in Camden and even with a GPS I found myself in some places where I shouldn't have been, but I survived.)

That's all just background to my point, which is that most people manage to find their way with the tools at their disposal. Some people just have an easier time than others. If aliens zap our navigational satellites and we have to go back to maps, I imagine we'll be okay.

The transition would favor those among us who are geographically talented, but it would also favor those who are level-headed and adaptable, which is my strategy for prevailing over a hard task. I was once on a long trip with another author and we were hopelessly lost in Louisville, Kentucky, even with our GPS. I was driving and every time we'd find that we'd gone wrong again, I just found a way to turn around and try a new approach. She commented that I seemed pretty unflappable, and I said that we'd eventually solve this problem if we kept trying.

In general, I've found that there's a lot of value in being willing to try something you're not good at, fail at it, and then keep trying until you figure it out.


Me too. Thanks for the advice.
 
Posts: 20703 | Registered: 31 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Beatification Candidate
Picture of Bernard
posted Hide Post
I don't have GPS. When I was learning to drive in NYC and subsequently started travelling out of the city on my way to NH, I would google maps and write down the directions. The first few times navigating the highways out to Queens and the Whitestone bridge had me a bit frazzled for the cars zipping past so fast, and I with a sheet of paper stretched across the steering wheel trying to make sure I was on the right side of the highway and didn't miss my exit! But it's worked so far. Still no GPS. I've thought of getting one, but honestly, I hate the voices.


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http://www.twistandvibrations.blogspot.com/

 
Posts: 9947 | Location: North Groton, NH | Registered: 21 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Has Achieved Nirvana
Picture of jon-nyc
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I briefly lost my phone at Disney last February. We found it an hour or so later at a lost and found.


In the interim, one of my first thoughts was 'tomorrow I'm going to have to drive to the airport with no GPS'. Of course I didn't have a map with me. I would have had to ask directions at the hotel and figured it out from there.

It seemed intimidating, until I remembered I did that for 20 years while traveling around the world before smart phones existed.
 
Posts: 30209 | Location: On the Hudson | Registered: 20 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Beatification Candidate
Picture of rontuner
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GPS has made my life as a piano tech much easier - in fact the new system I use links between the client list and google maps and can display my route for the day and allows me to map to the next client with a swipe and a tap; no need to enter the address or search.

But yes, I often follow blindly along...


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Visit me on the Web!
www.ronkoval.com

 
Posts: 6105 | Location: chicagoland | Registered: 21 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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